In May, I facilitated an exciting discussion at a kick-off event for the North American Occupational Safety and Health (NAOSH) organization. Prior to the beginning of the session, my colleagues and I surveyed the audience. More than 60% of audience members stated they were currently being bullied in their workplaces. The national average is 50%. Those in the room for our event could define bullying and therefore, recognize it which explains the difference in numbers. Once people are able to define what it is, many (10% in this case) realize they have been bullied or they themselves are the bully. Knowledge is power! So what is bullying? Bullying is a persistent, repetitive teasing, harassing and/or demeaning behaviour that negatively impacts the victim. Many do not understand this or recognize it and not many talk about it. As an example, Anne sees that her colleague rolls her eyes and sighs whenever she speaks during a meeting. This persistent, passive aggressive behaviour intimidated Anne to the point that she no longer felt comfortable contributing to office discussions and eventually she quit her job. Bullying can also be a one-time event that is so significant and devastating that it negatively impacts the emotional well-being of the victim. For example, Tom was physically attacked in his office; he was in a disagreement with a colleague who then threw a stapler at him. Over 50% of workers, from the shop floor to the executive suite have stories like these to share. It costs us money, time, emotional well being and even physical injuries, not just from violence in the workplace but from distractions that cause distractions and unseen risks. How can we fix this? As previously stated, knowledge is power. The first step to making a difference in bullying is to recognize that it is happening. I challenge you to go back to your workplace and consider the definitions that I have laid out. Is there a bully in your workplace? Is there more than one? Are you the bully? Now that we know the problem exists, we can set out to correct it. In my next post I will lay out the steps to making change in your workplace.   — Paul Kells Workplace Respect and Safety Champion, Culture Change Expert and Inspiring Speaker Reach new standards for safe and positive workplace cultures...